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lowtide

lowtide

Living In:
United-Kingdom United-Kingdom
Gender: Male
Age: 56 years
Member Since: on Mar 29, 2016 at 03:50:45
Last Sign In: on Dec 10, 2017 at 19:36:38
lowtide
lowtide
M 56 United-Kingdom
...but what songs are they singing? I hope it's a Christmas song.
on Nov 17, 2017 at 04:37:42
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lowtide
lowtide
M 56 United-Kingdom
the trail of breadcrumbs
half a cup of tea gone cold
an empty kitchen
on Nov 16, 2017 at 14:44:06
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lowtide
lowtide
M 56 United-Kingdom
Can't you be more specific about why you are doing this; what you hope to get out of it and what kind of books you like and don't like to read - I've commended books in previous threads here - would you consider reading any modern poetry for instance? I manage about 10-20 books a year depending on how thick they are but read virtually no fiction (outside poetry which isn't always or completely fiction)
on Nov 14, 2017 at 21:25:00
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lowtide
lowtide
M 56 United-Kingdom
France! My sister moved there in 2001 and her experiences have definitely put me off - the bureaucracy involved in being self employed, getting building work/renovations approved and paying taxes - it's painful, complicated and always changing at short notice..plus a host of other things.
on Nov 14, 2017 at 21:20:03
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lowtide
lowtide
M 56 United-Kingdom
sojo50 - I think your tree looks great - it's what I hope for - I'll be able to see it from the place I work though the windows at the back of my house that look out on the garden - why would you not be that excited by your tree - it sounds like it has some interest all year round? I didn't want anything too large and it should cast some dappled shade in a few years time on the place next to it where I can sit and work outside in the summer in the afternoons (the taller mountain ash I put in will do the same). There are quite a few varieties - the amelanchier x grandiflora (apple serviceberry) I bought, is a "Ballerina" variety. At the moment there are berries on the berberis and cotoneaster but the blackbirds and bullfinches definitely favour the orange berries on the berberis atm. Asthe mountain ash and amelanchier also have berries it should attract (and help feed) a few more birds. I cut a circular bed around the tree this weekend and planted 100 snowdrops around the tree - I have another 250 snowdrops arriving tomorrow and also cut a circular bed around a multi-stem silver birch that I put in middle of the front lawn - hopefully most of them will come through next spring.
on Nov 14, 2017 at 20:05:52
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lowtide
lowtide
M 56 United-Kingdom
New Scientist and Scientific American but in the summer months, when journalists are on holiday (I suspect) New Scientist becomes quite thin and full of job adverts.
on Nov 12, 2017 at 06:45:25
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lowtide
lowtide
M 56 United-Kingdom
jdoggy - I hadn't come across them but maybe it's because I wasn't looking for anything too formal - if I ever end up living in a stately home I might consider it - the head gardener can look after it. I looked at the price of buying a a 4-5m cloud tree which had been shaped - it was nearly 3000!

I bought an amelanchier x grandiflora - a tree well known in the US but under many different names - Juneberry, Serviceberry, Shadblow, Shadbush
https://www.primrose.co.uk/-p-112250.html?adtype=pla&kwd=&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIpf3k7Pe41wIVczPTCh2XZwDqEAQYASABEgLFmvD_BwE

I also dug out the half-dead/half-alive sweet gum tree (liquidambar) but ill replace it with another sweet gum - probably the "gum ball" type if I can find one at the right price - gardening is expensive! The cats will miss the tree I took out as the trunk was right next to a low wall and they both scratch up it - having taken it out one of the cats spent a lot of time smelling the tree, rubbing up against it and licking the sap seeping out of the damaged root so there must be more to the reason why they liked the tree than the joy of scratching in to the deep fractured alligator skin bark (the sweet gum is sometimes called the alligator skin tree).

sojo50 - this is a problem in our street too - rented properties - the landlords only want to take the rent - they never want to spend any money on maintaining the gardens - trees and hedges especially, which become very tall and/or overgrown. As for blossom on the lawn - I don't really mind - the amelanchier is bound to produce but nothing like the quantity the cherry trees produce.
on Nov 12, 2017 at 06:43:38
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lowtide
lowtide
M 56 United-Kingdom
Isabel - I totally agree. I parked my car and on the way in to a supermarket to do quite a lot of shopping I noticed a young mum sat in a car with her toddler strapped into his seat - I thought maybe she had just arrived and was about to go into the shop or had just got in the car having completed her shopping; she was on her phone. I did my shopping and about 30 mins later, as I came out, the woman with the child strapped in the car seat was on her phone - I guess, ignoring her child - it's so sad - you see it so often, mums walking down the road with their precious child in a pushchair, ignoring them while they stab at their phones or talk inanely about nothing of importance - I hate to see children being ignored this way - I watch mums and see this happen virtually every day. I also see dog walkers ignoring their dogs while on their phones - I think they should interact with their dog - to a pet, their owners are the most important people in their lives - at least talk to them, meet their gaze, play with them - build a relationship with them and it's the same with young children - they benefit so much from the attention and interaction with their parents. In supermarkets I overhear inept men ringing their wives to ask which washing powder, cosmetic or sanitary products to buy or people who are just badly organised asking their partners to check in the fridge or cupboards to see if they have a particular item; in short, I dislike the way people use their phones and the impact is has on communication between people. At lunch time my wife says the place where they eat lunch is full of people looking at their phones - no one talks any more. I have a smart phone and a dumb phone - I use the dumb phone far more - the smart phone gets used when I'm away from home - a weekend away or if I'm in an unfamiliar place but I can go weeks without needing to use it.
on Nov 7, 2017 at 15:42:27
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lowtide
lowtide
M 56 United-Kingdom
My immediate thought was to choose snow because of the way it transforms the landscape but I'll opt for rain because, in spring, it is often followed by the sound of blackbirds singing and because I have more atmospheric memories of times holed up in tents, cabins or cottages, waiting for it to pass or listening to it through an open window at night or the sound of thunder that sometimes comes with rain but never with snow.

In a coffee house -
Quiet corner where you can cut yourself off from everyone and everything?
or
Seat where you can people-watch or window watch?
on Nov 7, 2017 at 09:06:52
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lowtide
lowtide
M 56 United-Kingdom
Well I'd prefer a steak and kidney pie to a straight steak pie any day and you can get steak and kidney suet puddings from most supermarkets that you can cook in the microwave if they are in a plastic container but once in a blue moon we will make one of our own at home. We used to have ox tongue on sandwiches as kids but I've not had it in a long time.

I never used to like liver because of the way my mother used to cook it - deep fat fried - it was like eating your own shoes. My wife taught me how to casserole liver (I do 95% of the cooking and baking at home) and now I really like it. We buy pigs liver, which is far less easy to get than lambs liver. You cut the thicker pieces so that they are thinner and cut out all the thicker circular vein walls with a sharp knife. I fry half a dozen rashers of streaky smoked bacon and either a couple of onions (I prefer red always but white are fine) and/or a dozen small round shallots if you have them and put them in s slow cooker on high, add a at least a pint of beef gravy then coat the liver in well seasoned (some salt & plenty of black pepper) flour - quickly flash fry the liver just to brown it off (the aim is not to cook it through - it will cook in the slow cooker - but simply to brown the outside of the meat off). Put the fried liver in the slow cooker with the bacon and onions (add a few mushrooms if you like too) and cook for 3-4 hours on high - you want to wait until the the liver goes slightly crumbly and no longer tastes paste-y. You may have to add a tablespoon of flour to thicken the gravy - I just sieve it in the the slow cooker during cooking if the gravy is looking a bit thin. We eat it with mashed potatoes - it's a very cheap and tasty meal - the gravy is brilliant IMHO so make sure you make plenty of it.

I did try cooking ox cheek (not tongue) last year - I bought it when I found I couldn't buy any pigs liver. I read it was a difficult meat to cook but I had heard it is very nice when cooked long and slow. I marinaded it in bottle of decent red wine for 24hrs, slow cooked it for 10 hours and it was still the most awful piece of meat I've ever had - it was gelatinous and blubbery - eugh - really terrible.
on Nov 5, 2017 at 18:23:07
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