CyberFriends.com - the worldwide friendship network
Topic:
Ornamental garden trees (UK)
lowtide
lowtide
M 55 United-Kingdom
No idea if there are actually many keen gardeners on CF so I'm half expecting no replies to this post. I was looking for ideas about ornamental trees, (i.e. not full-sized trees like oak, chestnut, sycamore, lyme, cedars, elms, willow which can grow to 20-40m in height,) - small deciduous trees that might grow to 6-8m at most. I am not interested in fruit trees. I really like the hornbeam "Frigiata" but they are just too big for my garden. Although I like flowering cherry blossom trees when I see them in parks and towns I am not keen to have one in my garden. What do you have in your garden that you like?

I have an acer palmatum (not sure about subspecies but it's a green one that turns through the full range of autumn colours - it's a very attractive tree IMHO and only about 2m tall atm)

Earlier this year I bought a single stem silver birch "Snow Queen" that has very white bark and is a little slower growing than some of the other white bark silver birches - it's about 3m tall atm.

I have just bought another "Snow Queen" (Silver Birch or Himalayan Birch "Betula utilis jacquemontii") but a multi-stem version) and Sorbus commixta "Embley" tree (or Scarlet Japanese Rowan tree) - both are about 2.5 tall.

I recently put a yellow Magnolia x Broklynensis "Elizabeth" tree about 2m tall in the back garden - I already have a white magnolia stellata tree in the front garden which will be great if it can get itself established - it seemed to be struggling so I'm feeding it NPK 7/7/7 fertiliser every few months.

I also have a Sweet Gum tree (or Liquidambar tree) which was in the garden when we moved here - something strange has happened to this tree as half of it is dead otherwise it would, I think, be a very nice tree - the bark is likened to alligator skin and the cats like scratching up it - I was thinking of getting another as, although some types can grow to 20m, they can be pruned and kept to a few metres in height - they are known for their vibrant autumnal colours - that's probably what I am thinking of getting unless someone can suggest something else to look at - there are so many great trees.
on Oct 19, 2017 at 19:49:27
Replies:
hope7dre
mod
hope7dre
F 57 USA
Have you ever tried a Japanese Tulip tree? They don't grow super tall but if you live in an area with 4 seasons, they'll bloom in two of them and they're leaves are very dark green.
on Oct 20, 2017 at 09:57:56
sojo50
vip
sojo50
F 67 Canada
If you like the flowering cherry trees but don't want a regular one, what about getting a weeping cherry. We have one that is about 12 feet tall now. In the spring, it has lovely blossoms, and then looks pretty the rest of the year with its weeping branches. Like having a miniature weeping willow without the size, and the mess!
on Oct 20, 2017 at 16:23:07
lowtide
lowtide
M 55 United-Kingdom
Thanks for the ideas - I've not heard of a Tulip tree and not thought about the weeping cherry either - do they not drop their blossom in the same way or is it just that there is a lot less? My lovely crazy wife is always sweeping up leaves - I'm surprised not to see her outside running around trying to catch all the falling autumn leaves before they hit the ground - she is a bit obsessive about tidiness and I think that's why she, more than I, isn't keen on very blossomy trees. We both like whites and yellows so the tulip tree looks good but maybe it's a bit too similar to the Elizabeth magnolia we just put in - there are just so many amazing and distinctly different trees - I'm keen on this so-called "strawberry" tree but maybe it spreads too much but we have space in the front garden for a couple of larger trees if we decide to give up the lawn - I'd be happy to do that.
https://www.ornamental-trees.co.uk/arbutus-unedo-tree-pp281
on Oct 21, 2017 at 05:41:33
hope7dre
mod
hope7dre
F 57 USA
Sorry, It's also called a Japanese Magnolia Tree and can be a few colors... white, pink, lavender, maybe even yellow. It may be similar to your Elizabeth magnolia. It can be shaped as a bush or a tree. I've left mine like a bush and it's probably 6 feet wide and 15 feet tall. It works as a great backdrop that way with smaller plants in front of it that give a wide variety of color. I'm sure whatever you find will turn out great.
on Oct 21, 2017 at 10:38:50
sojo50
vip
sojo50
F 67 Canada
I guess with any sort of tree that blossoms, you are going to get some mess. I always figure that the beauty of the tree in blossom is worth the mess!

P.S. If your wife is obsessive about cleaning up fallen leaves, she would be horrified if she could see the scene across the street from me. The house is a rental, and there is a huge red maple tree in the front yard which is rapidly dropping its leaves. However, a rake is yet to appear and the people already have to walk through about 4 inches of leaves to get in the front door!
on Oct 21, 2017 at 15:20:01
jdoggy
jdoggy
M 62 United-Kingdom
Hi
I recently went to a garden open day. I was blown away by the garden, the family who owned the property must have spent thousands on modelling it. I could never afford to do something like that.

One aspect really stood out. Cloud Trees. I'm not sure of the type of tree they used but they were shaped into masses of foliage at the tips of bare limbs. They were about 6M tall and looked stunning. I googled 'cloud trees' and it seems they a a style of topiary rather than a tree type. it might not be your thing but if I was in the market for an ornamental tree (and a wow factor) i'd go for one (or 2)
on Nov 11, 2017 at 16:32:40
lowtide
lowtide
M 55 United-Kingdom
jdoggy - I hadn't come across them but maybe it's because I wasn't looking for anything too formal - if I ever end up living in a stately home I might consider it - the head gardener can look after it. I looked at the price of buying a a 4-5m cloud tree which had been shaped - it was nearly 3000!

I bought an amelanchier x grandiflora - a tree well known in the US but under many different names - Juneberry, Serviceberry, Shadblow, Shadbush
https://www.primrose.co.uk/-p-112250.html?adtype=pla&kwd=&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIpf3k7Pe41wIVczPTCh2XZwDqEAQYASABEgLFmvD_BwE

I also dug out the half-dead/half-alive sweet gum tree (liquidambar) but ill replace it with another sweet gum - probably the "gum ball" type if I can find one at the right price - gardening is expensive! The cats will miss the tree I took out as the trunk was right next to a low wall and they both scratch up it - having taken it out one of the cats spent a lot of time smelling the tree, rubbing up against it and licking the sap seeping out of the damaged root so there must be more to the reason why they liked the tree than the joy of scratching in to the deep fractured alligator skin bark (the sweet gum is sometimes called the alligator skin tree).

sojo50 - this is a problem in our street too - rented properties - the landlords only want to take the rent - they never want to spend any money on maintaining the gardens - trees and hedges especially, which become very tall and/or overgrown. As for blossom on the lawn - I don't really mind - the amelanchier is bound to produce but nothing like the quantity the cherry trees produce.
on Nov 12, 2017 at 06:43:38
sojo50
vip
sojo50
F 67 Canada
Lowtide, here in Canada, the tenant is expected to maintain the garden of the property they are renting, like mowing the lawn, raking leaves, trimming hedges, etc.... The landlord might do jobs like pruning fruit trees or removing dangerous tree limbs, but that's about it.

Of interest, I happen to have a Serviceberry tree in my yard. I can't say that we're terribly excited about it, but it is a native tree and when we landscaped the backyard, there was a big push on to use these native trees. In the wild, we see these as bushes bearing berries called Saskatoons. The tree gets these berries too, which are edible, but the birds usually get to them first. The tree is quite pretty in autumn with orangey red leaves. I will post a photo of our Serviceberry in blossom in my photos here on CF.
on Nov 13, 2017 at 17:29:16
lowtide
lowtide
M 55 United-Kingdom
sojo50 - I think your tree looks great - it's what I hope for - I'll be able to see it from the place I work though the windows at the back of my house that look out on the garden - why would you not be that excited by your tree - it sounds like it has some interest all year round? I didn't want anything too large and it should cast some dappled shade in a few years time on the place next to it where I can sit and work outside in the summer in the afternoons (the taller mountain ash I put in will do the same). There are quite a few varieties - the amelanchier x grandiflora (apple serviceberry) I bought, is a "Ballerina" variety. At the moment there are berries on the berberis and cotoneaster but the blackbirds and bullfinches definitely favour the orange berries on the berberis atm. Asthe mountain ash and amelanchier also have berries it should attract (and help feed) a few more birds. I cut a circular bed around the tree this weekend and planted 100 snowdrops around the tree - I have another 250 snowdrops arriving tomorrow and also cut a circular bed around a multi-stem silver birch that I put in middle of the front lawn - hopefully most of them will come through next spring.
on Nov 14, 2017 at 20:05:52
Home | Contact Us
Copyright © 2017 - All rights reserved.